Consider Early Pay Discount To Increase Cash Flow

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

Many industries have a traditional preset discount off the invoice for paying early.  As the customer I used to take advantage of an 8% discount if I paid my supplier by the 10th of the following month.  The invoice was due, otherwise, at the end of 30 days.

As a provider of a product or service your business may want to consider implementing an early pay discount. The discount may only be 1-2% but will be enough to entice some customers to pay early.

The key decision for your company is balancing the bottom line profit impact against the potential for increased cash flow from your customers.

Here are some thoughts to guide you in your decision making:

  1. Does your industry currently offer a discount for early pay?  If not, then this could be a way for your company to differentiate itself from the competition.  The result could be added sales as the early pay discount is perceived as added value by your company and you can steal marketshare. The fact that the customers you acquire would have strong cash flow (evidenced by the ability to take the discount) would be a plus. 
  2. An ongoing argument against early discounts is its potential negative impact on profits.  Can the discount be passed on as a price increase?  Your customer may not balk at a 1-2% increase in prices if it has been some time since the last increase and you provide a high quality dependable product.  If you are concerned about implementing a price increase at this time  then wait and piggyback the increase on top of an increase in price in the future.
  3. What is the interest cost to your company to currently fund  accounts receivable?  This should be factored into the profit computation.
  4. Also, determine if there is operational savings realized by having less accounts receivable to collect due to accelerated payments.
  5. Not everyone will take advantage of the early payment discount.  For those who do not, if a price increase is in place to support the discount, then your company just realized more gross margin dollars and percent.
  6. You cannot let a customer pay late and take advantage of the early pay discount.  An aggressive accounts payable manager will attempt this if you do not catch it and cut it off.  Assume this will happen.  
  7. Invoices need to be received at the same time the product is delivered so that your customer has time to process the early pay discount. You do not want to give your customer an excuse for taking the discount late.  
  8. Your best creditworthy customers will take advantage of the discount.  Prior to your company offering a discount your customer was most likely aggressive in delaying payment as long as possible to preserve their own cash.  The trade-off, as discussed earlier, is faster availability of cash for your company back against the discount cost. 

Which is the best way?

In my opinion, I want to find a way to make an early pay discount program work with a minimal cost to my profit.  I believe the quicker I can get use of cash the faster I can put it to work and  the greater potential there is to increase my overall return on investment.

I would be interested to know what your experience has been.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: