Posts Tagged ‘performance’

Save Time And Cash With A Few Good Performance Measurements

May 27, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

Next to more sales and more cash most owners and managers would list a desire for more time in their day.

How does an owner keep track of what is happening in the company when he or she is consumed with meetings, addressing emergencies and fulfilling commitments outside the office?

It is a challenge to say the least!

I have found there are a few measures of performance I can access daily and weekly that quickly tells me if things are going as planned.  These measures almost act as early warning signals that a small problem may be about to become an all encompassing issue the whole management team will have to address.  I refer to them as “How are we doing” metrics.

Every manager and every company is different.  I encourage you to identify a few key metrics that will work for you and your business.  My suggestion, however, is to not overdue the number of measurements you are tracking.  If you are having to dedicate staff to just preparing a few indicators for your review then you are probably looking at too many.

The measurements should be easily accessible and help you improve the company.  If they cannot aid in increasing sales or cash flow then maybe you can review that data later.

Over the last 20 years there has been a mini industry created in performance measurements.  Many PhDs and consultants have made a career in marketing  “Balanced Scorecards”, “Strategy Maps” and other indicators of productivity.  I find most of them interesting but often too costly to prepare and sometimes ignored by management teams.  If you use these and they work for your company then by all means you should continue.

The measurements I use appear to be obvious ones but that is OK.  They have worked for me.  Maybe they might work for you:

Cash Report:  This is a daily report that  shows the bank balance, deposits made, payments transmitted and ending balance or float.  I never want to be surprised on cash, whether it’s coming or going.

Daily Sales:  I know my sales plan and this tells me if we are tracking to hit it.  If it is a company that issues leads daily I will want to know conversion rate.  If there are multiple locations, product lines, or divisions I will want to know if all of them are tracking to hit their monthly sales goals.

Accounts Receivable Aging:  I want to see this weekly and determine who owes us money and if the  amount is increasing.  In my opinion, we deserve to be paid for the quality work we did and I am very aggressive in wanting to be paid on time.  I will also do a mental calculation of days of sales outstanding.

Accounts Payable Report:  I want to see this weekly and compare the balance owed against cash on hand, jobs moving through the system and new sales being generated.  In the event I get a call from the CEO of my top supplier, I always want to know what we owe and if we are current.

Marketing Percent to Net Sales:  This is normally a monthly report that tells me if we are overspending to create sales.  Many companies have gone out of business from spending too much in this area.  If sales are trailing the plan dramatically during the month I may cut back some area of marketing before the month is over.

These are the key performance measurements I stay on top of.  There are many other reports that I will review from time to time such as Revenue per Employee, Revenue per Visitor on a website and, of course, monthly financials.  But these 5 performance measures are important to me.  You may have different ones that work for your business.

Regardless what metric you use there are 3 important elements to keep in mind with each report:

  1. Establish a beginning baseline from which to measure results.  All measurements need a starting point.
  2. Always look at  trend over time of any performance measurement.  Are the current results just a blip or is there a pattern occurring?  Some management teams like to illustrate trends with a graph for impact.
  3. Take action.  Unless the results were a blip then, at a minimum, you need to ask more questions or look at additional data.  Is there a problem with pricing, a promotion, or a key account?  Are there quality issues preventing collection of money due?  Information is only good if you do something with it.

A few good performance measurements can save time, increase your personal productivity and improve cash flow and profit.

Make sure they exist in your company and are used.

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Use A Baseline Measurement To Track Change In Performance

May 14, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

Here is a simple tip from the field of medicine that will increase your productivity, cash flow and overall profit performance.

I  cannot believe how often management in any type of business I see fails to do this.

And that is to start with a baseline measurement when making a change.

The best at using baseline measurements is the medical community.  The Doctor, nurse, or hospital always starts by getting your beginning weight, cholesterol reading, red blood cell count, blood pressure, temperature or some other measurement to help them track the rate of progress, or lack thereof.

As management, we need to do the same in order to assure ourselves that cash invested is getting the results we want.  If you are going to invest additional dollars in some new program or project you want to know that you will get an expected payback within an acceptable period of time.

You can have all the metrics, measurements, and progress points you want but it is imperative that you start with an accurate beginning baseline measurement from which you can track the expected improvement.

Think about that the next time you initiate a new energy savings program, search engine optimization strategy, increase in media spend, bonus program or any of the many tweaks and adjustments you make every month in your business.

Did you have a starting point to measure against?

If it works for your blood pressure it may also be a remedy for your business.