Posts Tagged ‘price’

A Business Must Pry Loose Consumer Savings

August 4, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

It has been widely reported that businesses of all sizes have accumulated cash over the last year to reduce debt and have a cash flow cushion going forward.

Someone else is doing the same thing.

The consumer has decided that saving money is a good and needed strategy for themselves and their families.

The US government reported that consumers saved 6.4% of after tax income for the month of July.  This trend in increased savings has been happening now for a few months.  Compare this savings rate to 1%+ prior to the economic chaos that started in 2008.

Why is the consumer deciding to save more at this point in time?  Here are a few reasons as I see them:

  • It is no secret that consumers are trying to reduce any and all debt they have.
  • Uncertainty plays a major role in consumer psychology.  The consumer is telling themselves that caution is the best strategy and that means saving dollars until they can get a better “feel” on the future of the economy.
  • The consumer is becoming wiser.  Part of what got the consumer and the country into economic trouble was spending on unnecessary products and services as well as houses bigger than were needed.  You can add to that a few vacation homes.  Now the consumer is still spending, but it is on more necessities and less on “feel good” items with no lasting value. Some of the remaining dollars is going into savings.

In spite of this new pragmatic approach by the consumer, businesses still have to generate sales.  The consumer has not stopped buying. They are just buying less and being more cautious.  A company needs to capitalize on that mindset.  Here is how to do it:

  1. Know who your target customer is and channel your available marketing dollars at that customer.  As  a business, you do not have the luxury of using a shotgun approach.  That only wastes cash flow.
  2. Know which of your services or products is most desired at this time by your target customer.  Don’t make the mistake of emphasizing secondary products, styles, colors, sizes, or categories in your offering.  Lead with your strength.  Do research to find out what that is if necessary.
  3. The consumer right now appears to only be buying bargains.  So give them a bargain.  Find a way to promote your most wanted items to the target customer at a price point they cannot refuse. Then cross market and up sell to increase the average sale and bump up margin.
  4. Offer the best guarantee or warranty that you possibly can.  The consumer is not very trusting right now.  Let them know that once they finally decide to buy that they can have peace of mind that their purchase will not be a mistake.  Trust and credibility in the seller is currently an important part of the buyers decision-making strategy. 

The consumer has money to spend.  And they will spend it given a good reason to do so.

It is up to the owner or CEO to give the consumer a valid reason to dip into the increase in savings and spend it with your company.

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The Personal Value System Of A Salesperson Can Quickly Kill Your Business Cash Flow

June 20, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

One mistake many sales people make when selling to a consumer is to project their own personal value system into the selling process.

That is a major mistake that can be the difference between closing the sale or being disappointed with the outcome.  The result is no sale and no addition to your business cash flow.  The prospect ends up buying  from the competition and your company needlessly lost revenue.

I have seen many salespersons not want to build the sale because they personally believed the total price would be too much.  In other cases where financing the transaction is an important option, I have seen salespersons not quote monthly payments because they never personally finance any purchases and do not believe anyone else should either.  Others don’t offer the product in a certain color because they personally do not like that color.  One retail salesperson I knew did not present one line of clothing to customers because she personally did not like the designer.

This happens in sales forces of all kinds and can be a cancer that will kill sales and valuable cash flow.

Sales managers need to train their sales forces to ask questions and gather plenty of information from the prospect about what the prospect wants and needs.  Then tailor the product or service offering based upon that information only.

The next time you see the sales volume of a sales person drop consider that one option may be that they are projecting their own personal value system into their selling process. Correct it and  both your sales and cash flow will increase.

Increase Sales And Business Cash Flow by Simply Asking For The Sale

June 19, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

As CEOs, owners, and senior managers we often spend countless hours analyzing why a sale did not occur. 

Was the price too high?  Is it poor advertising?  Was our product the wrong design? Are we marketing to the wrong customer?

Many times I have found the reason is very simple. 

No one asked for the sale.  You may be thinking that no way does that happen in my company.  You have a selling methodology in place and your sales manager  reviews it weekly in sales meetings.  Well, it happens.  And it can occur in retail stores,  with in home sales persons and in business to business selling situations.

In a business to consumer company I was involved with, we would follow-up the sales visit with a “quality control” phone call to the prospect that did not buy.  Our conversation asked if our sales person was on time, explained the benefits of our product and answered all their questions.  Invariably the feedback was extremely positive on our sales person and many times when we questioned why the prospect did not buy, the feedback would be that they were not asked to buy.  The call would conclude by asking if they were ready to purchase, the prospect often said yes and we would schedule a manager to go write the sale.

Why do sales people fail to ask for the sale?  I have found many sales people do not ask because they are afraid the answer will be “no.”  It is easier to report back that the prospect wanted to “think it over.”

When asking for the sale everyone wants to hear a “yes.”  However, a “no” answer is not bad because now the sales person can identify the objection and overcome it.  If no one asks for the sale then there is no chance to overcome an objection and close the deal.

How can an owner or CEO prevent this problem  from happening?  The best way to identify which sales persons have this problem is for the sales manager to observe the interaction with the prospect at the point of sale.  By doing this the manager can then coach the sales person on what to say the next time he or she is on a sales call.

Failure to ask for the sale is a problem that is never discussed enough with sales forces.

In my opinion, if you don’t ask for the sale then all that took place was a nice conversation. 

That won’t help revenue, cash flow, or profit.

Key Supplier Relationship Will Increase Cash Flow

May 3, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

The relationship between a key supplier and customer can be like family.

Executed correctly this relationship can profitably grow the sales and profit of both companies.

As you become more important to your supplier here are a few tips that can act as a guide to increase the amount of cash available for you to grow your business:

  1. Ask for and get extended terms on each invoice.  Once established you should not have to pay the same terms as a new customer of your supplier.  If 30 days is normal then ask for 60 day terms.
  2. If you have inventory make sure your supplier exchanges slow-moving inventory units for what is being used or sold the most.  This should be done a minimum once every 6 months, preferably once per quarter.  In some industries it makes sense to do it once per month.  Show future sales projections so your supplier can justify taking this action. 
  3. When the above inventory is returned make sure there is no restocking charge applied.
  4. If your business is seasonal, you may want to negotiate paying less during the slow months and more during the busy months.
  5. Have your supplier fund the purchase of a major capital item you need to buy to grow your marketshare. This may be a new piece of equipment needed in your manufacturing facility that will allow you to be more productive.  The payment can be spread over a multiyear term with a small amount added to each unit of inventory purchased from your supplier.
  6. Once you have become a major customer or “partner” of your supplier negotiate putting the key items being bought on consignment in your facility.  This inventory remains on the books of your supplier until you are ready to “pull” them for use in manufacturing.  Only then does the terms begin on your invoice.  If you combine consignment with extended terms then your cash flow really explodes.  To properly execute a program like this requires the use of security agreements and physical inventories but the cash savings is worth it.
  7. Negotiate additional advertising coop and simplify how it is processed.  Many companies offer a marketing rebate or credit to their best customers but then make it almost impossible to get due to extreme rules and regulations.  If possible, agree in advance on an advertising coop amount and deduct a fixed amount each month from invoices.  At the end of the year you can reconcile any differences.
  8. Ask for a price decrease.  You may be surprised how often a supplier will grant this wish to a major customer.  They realize the cost to acquire a new customer is high and realize your increased margin dollars over time will make up for a 2-3% drop in price.
  9. If you cannot get a price decrease, then get an agreement that the price either will not be increased or will be increased only by no more than a certain percent for a specific period of time.
  10. Regardless how great the relationship is and regardless how many concessions you are given, you need to still periodically compare prices in the market place.  If not locked down  prices can start creeping up.  There should be an understanding in a good relationship that you are always getting the best price possible.

Suppliers can be a great source of cash flow.  I have successfully used every one of the tips mentioned here.

A lot of the cash or money used to grow your business can come from well executed cash flow strategies.

This is one of them.

Increase Cash Flow With A Unique Value Proposition Strategy

April 27, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

What makes your company unique from the competition?

Can you ask a higher price and get it?

What is your competitive advantage?  Can you say it in about 10 words?

A unique value proposition is what your company is promising to deliver to a prospect that is better than anyone else can deliver.  A well executed value proposition delivers benefits that will address your customer’s wants or needs in ways that competitors wish they could duplicate but cannot.

If you have no value proposition or have an unclear value proposition then you will not be different from the hundreds or thousands of companies competing in your category.  You will get lost in the crowd.  

Your business will find itself competing on price as the differentiator and we all know there is always someone who is willing to keep dropping the price to get the deal.  This will kill marketshare, gross margin, profit, cash flow, and eventually your company.  Don’t let the competition dictate your pricing, profit strategy, and your future.

Here are a few thoughts to guide you when considering your value proposition:

  1. You must first know who your prospective customer is and what they want.  What is their pain?  What is their want or desire?  Do they think of your company first as a source to address that desire or pain?  Once you have identified your prospective customer, take a sample group and ask them what their biggest need is.  You will soon see a pattern that will give you direction.
  2. Be specific about the benefits you deliver, how they address your prospect’s wants and needs,  and how they differ from the competition.  Also, keep in mind that benefits differ from features.
  3. Show that your company has experience delivering this value proposition to others.  Third party testimonials often close a sale.
  4. Is your company capable of consistently delivering your value proposition at the quality level that you promise and your customer expects.  In otherwards, don’t over promise and under deliver in an attempt to be different.
  5. Can your value proposition be easily duplicated by others?  If  it can then do you really have a unique value proposition?  A $1.00 menu item or free delivery are examples that have quickly become the norm in some industries.  Make it hard for others to copy what you do.
  6. A well thought out value proposition becomes an effective guide for strategic and tactical decisions involving product development, customer communication, marketing, recruitment of talent and overall financial planning.
  7. Can the value proposition evolve over time as your customer’s wants and needs change?  If so, it will allow your business to think strategically and lead your customer forward with game changing innovations.

A unique value proposition gives your company a road map to growth and increased cash flow. It will make you different and allow your business to ask and get a higher price for what you offer.

Don’t try to be all things to all people. 

You just waste cash doing it.