Posts Tagged ‘revenue’

Calculate Revenue Per Employee To Increase Productivity And Cash Flow

July 22, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

If your company is increasing productivity then chances are the cash flow  of your business is also improving.

That is a good thing.

But how do you know if the productivity of your business is showing improvement?

Is there a quick easy way for an owner or CEO to know if the efforts to improve productivity compared to other businesses is working?

Yes there is.  One quick metric that will give the owner a snapshot is Revenue per Employee.  It is simply total revenue or sales divided by the number of employees.  If your company can increase sales while staying at the same employee level then it tells you that  the combined efforts of all employees is having a positive impact on sales growth and probably on cash flow.

Industries differ in the Revenue per Employee calculation that is reported.  Software companies and oil companies can have a high Revenue per Employee while retailers may show a smaller Revenue per Employee.  J. Bryan Scott showed an interesting table right here of 100 companies and their Revenue per Employee totals.

For the owner, it is critical that you define what an employee is.  I have always liked to use full-time equivalents (FTE).  For example, 2 part-time 20 hour employees equal 1 full-time 40 hour employee.  I would define how many hours is a FTE and divide that into total hours  worked.  That is my number of employees.  I take the sales total and divide by the number of employees to get my Revenue per Employee.  Retailers are often a good example of why FTE needs to be used.  Some retailers choose to employ primarily part-time employees while others choose to employ primarily full-time.  Wal Mart probably has a low Revenue per Employee number if they don’t calculate using FTE.

The other caveat is to recognize when comparing to other companies that they may have a high percentage of their work done by outside contractors who are not employees.  As a result, the company will appear very productive because there would be a high Revenue per Employee reported.  I would imagine Microsoft and oil companies like BP or Shell that use a lot of outside contractors will have high Revenue per Employee calculations.  

When it is all said and done, the truest measurement of productivity using Revenue per Employee is to track the trend in your own company.  Is Revenue per Employee going up or down?  Take the best year of sales and profitability in the history of your company and use that year’s Revenue per Employee calculation as a baseline to compare to.  If I had a bad 2nd quarter, I would want to compare the Revenue per Employee back against that baseline year.  Then I would take action to get to my baseline for the next quarter.

If you have an industry association where everyone computes Revenue per Employee the same way, then that becomes a great way to measure how productive your company is.

As an annual goal for my company, I would always challenge my management team with an aggressive improvement in Revenue per Employee.  I know that if I hit the goal then I probably had a great year from a sales, profit and cash flow standpoint.

I would be interested to know if your company has had success using Revenue per Employee as a productivity calculation.

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Slow Economic Recovery Makes Business Cash Flow A Priority

June 30, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group

The economy is not bouncing back as quickly as some expected.  There is confusion and doubt about the path of the economic recovery.  Even the economists that projected a choppy recovery are seeing that the resumption of growth is slower than anticipated.

This means more than ever, it is important for every business of any size to maintain a strong cash flow position.

In my opinion, the facts supporting a continued slow recovery are obvious:

  • Consumer confidence remains mixed at best.  Two different reliable reporting groups  reported May consumer confidence moving in opposite directions.  For many reasons, I believe consumers do not feel good about things now and I don’t see that changing for a while.  The future of the economy is tied directly and indirectly to the feelings of the everyday consumer.  If they are not confident then the consumer will not spend and cash flow of businesses will be impacted.  This important indicator will have to be closely monitored going forward to determine what the real truth is.
  • Housing sales are not showing any upward momentum.  With the government tax credits going  away there are fewer homes being sold.  This decline reverberates throughout the economy.  There will have to be a further drop in prices to trigger an increase in demand.
  • Commercial real estate problems still exist.  Increased vacancies in retail and office space is a reflection of a soft economy.  If businesses do not expand or even reduce in size then they don’t need space.  The landlords holding this space still have mortgages to pay. This problem will still be a front burner issue in 2011.
  • There will be no more government stimulus prior to November 2010 elections. The prior stimulus methods temporarily helped boost the economy.  The political mindset now is to reduce debt.  Going forward,  the private sector has to carry the weight of the recovery by themselves. 
  • The Federal Reserve will not reduce interest rates further.  When it comes to lowering interest the Federal Reserve has done all that it can.  Don’t look for lower rates to further stimulate the economy.
  • The unemployment is still high and will be for the forseeable future.  Government census workers helped boost employment for awhile.  Additional workers will only be hired as business confidence suggests a reason to expect improved revenue over the longer term.  That confidence currently is not there.

So, what should a business be doing?

Here are 7 action steps your company should be doing right now:

  1. Have realistic revenue goals going into the second half of 2010.  Do not gear up for a sales increase that won’t be there.  Your original sales projections for the year may now be outdated.   All other expense areas take their direction from the sales plan so get it as accurate as you can.
  2. Know your business’s breakeven point.  Make sure you operate at or below it.  Failure to do this will consume precious cash flow.
  3. Maintain good relations with key suppliers.  Don’t create surprises for your partners and you will find most of them will be there to help if you need assistance like extending terms.  Do this by communicating how things are going.  It helps your suppliers plan for the future too.
  4. Do not lose existing customers while attempting to generate new business.  New customers cost more to add than keeping old customers. If you have a zero sum game with the number of customers in  your database this too will eat up cash flow. A tip to keep customers happy is to deliver some type of  added value (ie: free shipping, etc) that may not be expensive to do but is attractive to your customer.
  5. Now is not the time to start new projects.  Keep a cash reserve and add to it if possible.  New opportunities will still exist in the future.  Make sure you are there to capitalize on them.
  6. Keep marketing costs in line with revised sales projections.  Do not assume that by increasing the marketing budget that more sales will automatically follow.  Don’t stop marketing but invest dollars in marketing channels that are proven.
  7. Keep gross margin in line.  Do this by making sure you are priced to make a profit.  That does not prevent you from running a short-term promotion that might temporarily decrease gross margin percentage but increase gross margin dollars.

A positive:   Banks appear to be adding fewer reserves for bad loans than before.  This will increase earnings and should start freeing up money to lend to consumers and businesses. This will be one source of cash flow that well run businesses will need in order to grow going forward.

Make sure your business model and financials are in good shape to access this cash from your bank as it becomes available.

Cash flow is the lifeblood of any business, especially in uncertain times.  Make sure you are protecting it.

Prioritize Accounts Receivable Collection As Interest Rates Rise

April 12, 2010

by Doug Smith, President, The Woodhaven Group 

A smart business person must have a successful cash flow strategy that is proactive and anticipates the impact on consumers and businesses from changes in the economy.

We are in the midst of rising interest rates taking place for homes, credit cards, and autos.  Combine these 3 critical areas with the fact that household debt continues to exceed household disposable income and that could be a formula for a potential decline in consumer spending.

If consumers have to pay off high existing debt with increasing interest rate levels it could slow up the purchases of consumer goods, both small and big ticket. The result would be a drop in revenue at businesses and a decline in their cash flow.  You could end up seeing your accounts receivable balances increase as your customers find it difficult to pay your invoices.

Don’t let this happen.  Have a strategy in place to collect your accounts receivable and keep the total balance outstanding  in line.  Do the following:

  1. Understand that as a company your employees and shareholders deserve to be paid on time for their efforts.  You put out a quality product and you stand behind it. 
  2. Assign a key manager to track accounts receivable balances and make that person accountable for making sure balances and aging do not get out of line.  Notice I said a manager and not a clerk.
  3. At a minimum you as owner or senior manager must see an accounts receivable aging report each week to see which customers are not paying on time.  Better yet, have a preset weekly meeting with the manager responsible for accounts receivable and come out of the meeting with action steps that need to be taken. Review the results at the next week’s meeting.
  4. Make it a practice to contact any key customer by phone immediately when an invoice is not paid on time. Follow up with a note.  This may sound drastic but if your customer knows to expect the call they will make sure you get paid on time. You may even have to make the call your self.
  5. Don’t let any one customer become too high a % of your overall revenue.  In my opinion, be careful if one client goes over 30% of your total revenue.  If they have financial trouble so could you.
  6. Have late payment fees and late interest charges and use them when you are not paid on time.
  7. Have a good collection agency or collection attorney in place to follow up on seriously delinquent clients.
  8. Whatever you do, get your invoices sent on time— best to have them arrive the same time as your shipment.

There are other suggestions for collecting accounts receivable that I will cover in future posts, but just make sure collecting accounts receivable is a major priority of your management team.  

Don’t be your customer’s bank!

It is your cash and you deserve to have it working for you—- not someone else. 

I would be interested in hearing what strategies you use to collect accounts receivable.